Terrorism & Workplace Violence

 

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  • No business, regardless of size, type or location should assume it is immune from acts of terrorism, cyberterrorism and computer hacking, workplace violence, bomb threats or sabotage.
  • While small businesses are not likely to be singled out as primary targets, they can easily suffer collateral damage from terrorist attacks.
  • While terrorism has been a fact of life in other countries for some time, it is no longer a problem that only happens somewhere else.
  • Bombings at the World Trade Center, Oklahoma City, 1996 Atlanta Olympics and the September 11th attacks at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon brought the threat home.
  • Palm Beach County is not immune from acts of terrorism. The anthrax attack in Boca Raton was the first bio-terrorist act on U.S. soil. Several of the World Trade Center terrorists lived and trained in our area. As a tourism-based community, many area businesses felt the ripple effects of the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks.
  • It is not just foreign countries that threaten us. Domestic groups including militia, anti-government, anti-abortion and animal rights organizations, to mention just a few, were responsible for about three fourths of the 335 incidents between 1980 and 2000 that the FBI classified as suspected or confirmed terrorism.
  • Workplace violence is a serious and deadly hazard both in terms of physical injury and psychological damage.
  • Most bomb threats are hoaxes which are made in an effort to disrupt normal business. However, no bomb threat should be dismissed as a hoax appropriate authorities should be notified.
  • Suspected sabotage is a problem that you can't afford to ignore. Given enough time, a repeated pattern of distortions, half-truths and orchestrated mischief can fester, with potentially devastating consequences for your business.
  • Computer hacking can cause loss of business and staff time and require significant repair costs. With American society and businesses increasingly more dependent on information technology, cyberterrorist attacks could cause as much devastation as more familiar forms of terrorism.
    • No business, regardless of size, type or location should assume it is immune from acts of terrorism, cyberterrorism and computer hacking, workplace violence, bomb threats or sabotage.
    • While small businesses are not likely to be singled out as primary targets, they can easily suffer collateral damage from terrorist attacks.
    • While terrorism has been a fact of life in other countries for some time, it is no longer a problem that only happens somewhere else.
    • Bombings at the World Trade Center, Oklahoma City, 1996 Atlanta Olympics and the September 11th attacks at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon brought the threat home.
    • Palm Beach County is not immune from acts of terrorism. The anthrax attack in Boca Raton was the first bio-terrorist act on U.S. soil. Several of the World Trade Center terrorists lived and trained in our area. As a tourism-based community, many area businesses felt the ripple effects of the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks.
    • It is not just foreign countries that threaten us. Domestic groups including militia, anti-government, anti-abortion and animal rights organizations, to mention just a few, were responsible for about three fourths of the 335 incidents between 1980 and 2000 that the FBI classified as suspected or confirmed terrorism.
    • Workplace violence is a serious and deadly hazard both in terms of physical injury and psychological damage.
    • Most bomb threats are hoaxes which are made in an effort to disrupt normal business. However, no bomb threat should be dismissed as a hoax appropriate authorities should be notified.
    • Suspected sabotage is a problem that you can't afford to ignore. Given enough time, a repeated pattern of distortions, half-truths and orchestrated mischief can fester, with potentially devastating consequences for your business.
    • Computer hacking can cause loss of business and staff time and require significant repair costs. With American society and businesses increasingly more dependent on information technology, cyberterrorist attacks could cause as much devastation as more familiar forms of terrorism.