‚ÄčThe marine environment provides many of the same hazards faced on land, along with some unique dangers that require boat owners to take special precautions and follow safety tips.   A boat fire can easily grow and quickly spread to neighboring boats and structures. Wooden and fiberglass boats filled with sails, furniture and diesel provide ample fuel to a fire.

 

  • Use Underwriter's Laboratory (UL) marine-approved cord sets and connections. Do not hook up if you see burn marks or your cord set will not firmly connect.
  • Routinely replace cord sets. Worn or overloaded cord sets and damaged shore power connections are a common cause of fires.
  • Regularly inspect electrical and fuel systems. Have a professional upgrade the wiring to maintain the needs of your navigational equipment and other appliances.
  • Never leave operating electrical equipment, including heaters, unattended. When leaving your boat for any reason, turn portable heaters off.
  • Smoke alarms are important life-saving devices and should be installed in your boat.
  • Plan your escape. Having an escape plan can save your life in an emergency.
  • Have a U.S.C.G. approved fire extinguisher onboard and know how to use it. Fire extinguishers should be mounted near an exit so you are moving toward an exit as you access the extinguisher.
  • Do your part to keep the dock clean and clear. Don't leave engine parts, tools or other equipment on the dock.
  • Properly dispose of oily rags in metal container with a tight-fitting lid. Leaving oily rags wrapped up in a grocery sack is not safe. The chemicals will begin to breakdown the rags, causing heat and possibly a fire.
  • Boat owners must take responsibility for preventing fires on their boats and in the marina. The most common causes of boat fires are: electrical malfunctions, unattended portable heaters and poor housekeeping.

If interested in this program, click here.